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Archive for July, 2007

Source Motivation

Posted by iBlog on July 5, 2007

Motivating Your Sources

1. Purpose or Goal
2. Benefits
3. Key Action Steps
4. Applicability Requirements
5. Researching
6. Reporting
7. Source Seeking
8. Advice Seeking
9. Advising
10. Shopping
11. Announcing
12. Purchasing
13. Connecting
14. Recognizing
15. Inviting
16. Schmoozing
17. Collaborating
18. Promoting
19. Sponsoring
20. Auditing

Types of Sources

1. Inspired to help
2. Have resources
3. Make good referrals
4. Trained to to the job
5. Have time to help
6. Would make great referrals

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Personality Types

Posted by iBlog on July 5, 2007

What MBTI Types Listen For

Sensors
Connections with what they already know
Facts and details
Building clocks
Simplicity
Steps
Precision
Practical applications

Intuitors
Something unknown
Conclusions
Innovation
Knowledge gaps
Big picture

Thinkers
Logical connections
Analytical data
Ideas
Intellectual challenge

Feelers
Relevance
Values
Emotions
Cooperation

Judgers
Organization
Commitment
Decisions
Certainity
Planning opportunities

Perceivers
New Perspectives
Flexibility
Change in opportunity
Unexpected

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Power Sources

Posted by iBlog on July 5, 2007

Sources of Power

Organizational Power

Role
Status, position, authority
Ability to make decisions
Power to reward or punish
Ability to give or withold recognition

Resources
Control of important resources

Infomation
Acess to, control of
Possession of information
Others need to do their jobs
Privileged Information

Network
Access to information
Committee
Political Contacts
Ability to get things done
Connections

Reputation
Awareness of knowledge
Expertise
Talents
Personal Attributes
Fame
Respect

Personal Power

Knowledge
Expertise in a subject
Procedural knowledge
Ability to apply knowledge

Expressiveness
Presentation
Public Speaking
Communicating Effectively
Ability To Persuade
Ability To Facilitate

Attraction
Sense of affinity with similarity to an individual
Friendliness, openess
Interest in others
Ability to listen
Empathize
Charisma

Character
Honesty
Trustworhiness
Loyalty
Respect for others
Personal ideals, values

History with the Influence
Comfort level
Willingness to work together
Degree to which others know

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Interpersonal Effectiveness

Posted by iBlog on July 5, 2007

Interpersonal Effectiveness

1. Act friendly in dimeanor

2. Make people feel important

3. Share value, acknowledge it

4. Be interested in people

5. Remember name’s

6. Remember facts and inquire about them

7. Always be honest with yourself, others

8. Be direct and straightforward

9. Develop listening skills

10. Admit if you are wrong

11. Be encouraging and involved

12. Be there when people need you

13. Let people save face

Negative Behaviors to Avoid

1. Negativity

2. Abrasiveness

3. Overeactions to stress

4. Foul language

5. Making people feel worthless

6. Overation to bad news

7. Panicking and anxiety to negativity

8. Making jokes at anyone’s expense

9. Direct remarks, “You should..”

10. Reminding people of what is wrong

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Fascilitating Group Interaction

Posted by iBlog on July 5, 2007

Facilitating Group Interaction

Facilitating group interaction requires all of the interpersonal skills addressed in the earlier parts of this manuel. Good facilitators are able to observe and participate in group processes simultaneously, to contribute on a content level while influencing the way group member work together.

Characteristics of Effective Groups

Listening well
Communicating well
Willingness to share
Try out other’s ideas
Ask for feedback
Attend to group maintainance
Supportive
People act as full and committed group members

Understanding Task Function of Groups

Initiating
Information Seeking
Clarifying
Information Giving
Collaborating
Summarizing
Consensus Testing

Understanding Maintainance Functions

Encouraging
Expressing Group Feelings
Collaborating
Influencing with Integrity
Gatekeeping
Harmonizing
Standard Setting

Understanding Group Communication

Wheel

Focused on one person
Single focus – high status, aggressive leader
Legitimate temporarily

Circle

Separate conversations
Result of disputes
Apathetic

Subgroups

Communicate among themselves
Splits group focus
Leaves people out
Healthy in short run
Lack of direction

Multilateral

Free flow communication
Center of attention
Group centered comments
Openess of dialogue
Member acts as the recorder

Observing Groups in Action

Participation
Task Functions
Maintenance Functions
Conflict Resolution
Membership
Influence
Norms

Forming Stages of Group Development

Feelings

Excitement, optimism
Satisfaction, pride for chosen team
Tentative attachment to team
Committment to its success
Anxiety about the task ahead

Behaviors

Define purpose and goals in group
Define group tasks
Determine roles
Determine norms
Decide how to process
Discess general concepts
Discuss problems
Complain about barriers

Common Issues

Trust
Purpose, goals confusing
Too anxious to succeed
Early direction
Group members not concerned of their own or other’s roles
Members are anxious about moving forward
No group norms

Storming

Most difficult stage

Members grow restless from lack of sleep, progress and attempts to take charge. Tasks are harder then they imagined, the drive to have their ideas accepted created competition and the strong egos that have led them to be part of the group may inhibit communication and cooperation. In this critical stage of development, conflict will be high and some members will withdraw and rely on their experience as individual contributors to try to get the job done.

Typical feelings during this stage

Frustration at the groups progress lack
Anxiety over lack of teamwork
Optimism about groups chances of success
Fear of using different approaches

Typical behaviors during this stage
Resisting the groups purpose, goals, tasks
Arguing among group member
Staking out areas of individual expertise
Forming subgroups
Perceiving a pecking order
Showing concern
Resisting leadership

Issues

Argue within group/stress or competitiveness
Competing members/collaborative interventions, brainstorming
Members are polarized/form subtask problem teams
Members do not listen effectively/reflective listening
Group is overwhelmed/problem solving situations

Norming Stages

During this stage group members reconcile their differences enough to collaborate on problem solving, decision making and other task related activities. Social proof becomes a powerful force in shaping individual behavior.

Typical Feelings

Relief of tension
Renewed confidence in ability for the group to succeed
Increased willingness to see oneself
Increased willingness to give and receive constructive feedback
Increased caring for the group

Typical Behaviors

Establish and enforce group norms
Communicate more openly
Work cooperatively
Negotiate
Test for building consensus in overt ways
Avoid conflict
Share feelings
Attend to the groups maintenace functions

Issues

No Group Identity
Members become too polite
Group cannot agree how to work together
Unwilling to engage in constructive conflict

Norming

Tension and conflict of stage two subsided
Renewed confidence
Increased willingness to see oneself
Increased caring for the group
Increased willingness to give and receive constructive feedback

Behaviors

Establish and reinforce group norms
Communicate more openly
Work cooperatively
Negotiate
Test for and build consensus
Avoid conflict
Share feelings
Attend to groups maintenance functions

Issues

No Identity
Group cannot agree how they will work together
Identifying problems in confusio
Members become too polite
Unwilling to engage in constructive conflict

Performing

When groups reach the performing stage, they have resolved their relationship issues and know how to work in collaboration. Individual members have learned and accepted one another’s strengths and weaknesses and have evolved in performance strategies that capitalize on strengths and mitigate weaknesses. During this stage, members are typically assertive, participate at a comfortable level and trust each other enough to share feelings and ask for help without losing status.

Typical Feelings

Accepting one another’s strengths and weaknesses
Trust in other members
Comfort in dealing with task and maintainance issues
Satisfaction and pride

Typical Behaviors

Adapting one’s style
Influencing multilaterally
Communicating openly
Balance asserting
Resolving or managing conflict
Collaborate on group tasks
Giving and receiving
Identifying strongly with the group

Issues

Identify implement solutions
Members work alone
Members sense their procedures and processes
Reaching a level of comfort
Leaving the group
Adjourning

Typical Feelings During Stage 5

Apprehension over impending lose of team
Exhilaration over what has been accomplished
Reluctance to bid farewell
Relief you took risks and were successful
Need for recognition
Unwilling to let go
Saying good-bye to one another
Evaluate results
Cleaning the group’s area

Interventions

Establish closing procedures
Design celebrations
Discuss endings
Provide a vehicle
End with a ritual

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Collaboration Principle

Posted by iBlog on July 5, 2007

Principle of Collaboration

Collaboration is having a working relationship where shared interests are shared through the process of dialogue and cooperation. When collaboration occurs, neither person’s perspective dominates. A perspective emerges through dialogue that neither person would have had independently. Collaborative relationships are creative. People who collaborate have shared values and goals. Unless their values and goals are common, their desires and visions will work at cross purposes and they willl have no basis for cooperation. People who collaborate learn to trust each other and trust requires enough history for people to learn to trust. Conflict is the ultimate breakdown in collaboration. The most effective approach to handling conflict is to try to build or rebuild a sense of collaboration with the people in conflict.

Shared Values
Shared Goals
Shared Perceptions
Cooperative Frame
Consistency of Trust

Principle of Asserting

Asserting yourself means expressing your needs and opinions openly. Assertiveness is not dominating or intimidating others, nbor being aggressive. Assertiveness means having a clear understanding of what you want. To be assertive you need to feel assertive as well as have the right to act as though your may assert yourself. Assertive people are emotionally balanced which means they are not emotional while being assertive. Assertiveness is balanced by listening.

Clarify Intentions
Remain Centered
Express Yourself
Support Your Expressions
Persistance

Expressing Yourself

Supporting Expressions
Persisting
Listening to Others
Being Sensitive to Non Verbal Signs
Enthusiasm
Confusion
Boredom
Personal Space

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